April Reads. The Good, The Bad and The Ugly!

Who Is Rich?   Coming out July 4th of this year. Just a hint, but at the end I didn’t care who Rich was.

 

Leaves of Fire (The Newirth Mythology #2) The second in the series and I am in love with this book! Release date is June 4th

 

Watching the Detectives (The Country Club Murders #5)  Meh…  May 23rd Release

Grief Cottage  Very interesting read!  Release Date is June 6th

The Simplicity of Cider   Ah….   Release Date is May 16th

The Godmothers: Spirited Away   Release Date is May 9th

 

The Woodpecker Always Pecks Twice (A Bird Lover's Mystery, #3)  Coming out on May 16th

Scars of Independence: America's Violent Birth   Release Date is May 9th

These are some of what I’ve read in April. You will have to wait for release day to read what I thought of them. Out of the 24 books I read in April I really only had 2 or 3 that were just Meh…

Now back to our regularly scheduled reading. Other Countries by Jo Bannister.

xx Patricia  vangiegolf

Advertisements

Woman of God by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro

Woman of God by [Patterson, James]

The world is watching as massive crowds gather in Rome, waiting for news of a new pope, one who promises to be unlike any other in history. It’s a turning point that may change the Church forever. Some followers are ecstatic that the movement reinvigorating the Church is about to reach the Vatican, but the leading candidate has made a legion of powerful enemies who aren’t afraid to kill for their cause.

Faith has never come easy for Brigid Fitzgerald. From her difficult childhood with drug-addled parents to her career as a doctor healing the wounded in Sudan to a series of trials that test her beliefs at every turn, Brigid’s convictions and callings have made her the target of all those who fear that the Church has lost its way–dangerous adversaries who abhor challenges to tradition. Locked in a deadly, high-stakes battle with forces determined to undermine everything she believes in, Brigid must convert her enemies to her cause before she loses her faith…and her life.

Spanning the globe–from the drug dens, high-powered law firms, and churches of Boston to the horrific brutality of a civil war in the Sudanese desert to the beauty, violence, and spiritual enlightenment of the Holy Land–Woman of God is an epic, thrilling tale of perseverance, love, trust and nothing less than what it means to live in a fallen world.

Maxine Paetro is one of my favorite co-authors for James Patterson.

Our story begins twenty years prior to the story, a short beginning with everyone waiting in the square to see the smoke when a new Pope is announced.

We follow Brigid from the dangerous Sudan, where she and her fellow doctors do their best to patch up the wounded flocking to their compound, to Rome, and all over the globe. Surrounded by factions that are killing any and everyone. When Brigid is injured and sent home to heal, she has no idea what to do. Her faith is questioned at every turn and at one point she turns away from the church.

A story of faith, struggles, and how the Catholic Church is moving forward into unfamiliar territory. As usual, there are the those on the fringes who are going to advocate violence rather than change the church and Brigid must let her faith in God be her guiding light into the future of the church and in her own tortured life.

How does one keep the faith when all the things you hold dearest are continually being taken away? How much loss is one woman capable of enduring? Will Brigid find her purpose and is that purpose being the next Pope?

You will have to read it and see! I was very happy to see this at my local library when it came in.  My favorite JP books are the ones with Ms. Paetro. The writing flows nicely and there is a female presence that is obvious in the book.

Lovely Book!

The Atheist Muslim: A Journey From Religion To Reason by Ali A. Rizvi

The Atheist Muslim: A Journey from Religion to ReasonStruggling to reconcile the Muslim society he was living in as a scientist and physician and the religion he was being raised in, Ali A. Rizvi eventually loses his faith. Discovering that he is not alone in his beliefs, he moves to North America and promises to use his new freedom of speech to represent the voices that are usually quashed before reaching the mainstream media―the Atheist Muslim.
In The Atheist Muslim, we follow Rizvi as he finds himself caught between two narrative voices he cannot relate to: extreme Islam and anti-Muslim bigotry in a post-9/11 world. The Atheist Muslim recounts the journey that allows Rizvi to criticize Islam―as one should be able to criticize any set of ideas―without demonizing his entire people. Emotionally and intellectually compelling, his personal story outlines the challenges of modern Islam and the factors that could help lead it toward a substantive, progressive reformation.

In The Atheist Muslim, we follow Rizvi as he finds himself caught between two narrative voices he cannot relate to: extreme Islam and anti-Muslim bigotry in a post-9/11 world. The Atheist Muslim recounts the journey that allows Rizvi to criticize Islam―as one should be able to criticize any set of ideas―without demonizing his entire people. Emotionally and intellectually compelling, his personal story outlines the challenges of modern Islam and the factors that could help lead it toward a substantive, progressive reformation.

To look at this book and to check the subject matter one may think this is an overwhelming read. It is not. It is so well written and documented that it was hard to take a break.

Along with his personal story, this was also an excellent history lesson. Are there some ideas we are born into and more that we grow into as individuals, becoming more aware of the differences and similarities between cultures and religions?

Church and State have long been connected in our world’s history. And that subject is dealt with thoroughly here. The author explains how our personal identity is all too often wrapped in our cultural identity.

I had specific questions going into this book and every one of them was answered. I am extremely glad to have read it and to recommend it.

Thank  you Netgalley for the opportunity.

AN ISHMAEL OF SYRIA by Asaad Almohammad

An Ishmael of Syria

Book Blurb:

Adam is a tortured soul. Exiled from his homeland, forced to watch the horrors unfold from afar. His family, still living – or surviving – in war-torn Syria struggle daily to feed, clothe, and educate their children.
Adam tries to be a ‘global citizen’ and become a part of his new community in Malaysia, but is constantly faced with intolerance, bigotry, and plain old racism. Opportunities are few and Adam finds himself working long hours for poor pay so that he can help his family.
The increasingly distressing news bulletins, along with Adam’s haunting childhood memories, compel him to examine his own beliefs; in God, in humanity, in himself and his integrity as a reluctant bystander in the worst human catastrophe of the twenty-first century.

A personal story told in the voice of Adam. A Syrian, living in Malaysia. Unable to live in his own country due to civil war and upheaval.. The story goes back and forth from the present to the memories of childhood .All of the different parts and pieces that make us who we are and shape our ideas of who we are and where we belong are brought into question. I felt as if I was reading someone’s journal. The feelings of not belonging to any place and unable to go back home.were so heartbreaking. Trying to assimilate into a new country is not easy when you look like Adam and the intolerant and racist people he comes into contact with on a daily basis made me embarrassed as a human being.

As he says in the book “…to their ears, being a Syrian sounds like you’re unclean, shameful, indecent; it’s like you owe the world an apology for your very existence.”

I learned more about the Middle East and Syria in this one book than I have in all of the news shows and history lessons I’ve taken. I can’t imagine being judged solely on my skin color or ethnicity. That the author has tackled this in such straightforward and easy to read book is a gift to us all.

An extremely timely story written by an author I have the deepest respect for.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Born in the 80s, Asaad Almohammad was raised in Ar-Raqqa, Syria. A member of the International Society of Political Psychology and a research fellow, he has spent years coordinating and working on research projects across the Middle East and North Africa. To date he has addressed a number of psychological aspects of civil unrest, post-conflict reconciliation, and deradicalisation. In his spare time Asaad closely follows political affairs, especially humanitarian crises and electoral campaigns. He is especially interested in immigration issues.