Yes, We Are A Republic, Not A Democracy..

For the past three years I’ve been taking classes on the Constitution and The Federalist’s Papers. I’m happy to say I have completed those. And in doing so have been in a lot of discussions arguments about what it does and does not say.

I’ve found people willing to come to blows about what our Forefathers said and did.

My best advice. Do your Research. Read your own country’s constitution and know what you are talking about before you start defending it. And that is all I am saying on the subject.

And that is the Sermon of The Day….Thank you for coming!

 

xx Patricia

Scars of Independence America’s Violent Birth by Holger Hoock

 

Scars of Independence: America's Violent Birth

The American Revolution is often portrayed as an orderly, restrained rebellion, with brave patriots defending their noble ideals against an oppressive empire. It’s a stirring narrative, and one the founders did their best to encourage after the war. But as historian Holger Hoock shows in this deeply researched and elegantly written account of America’s founding, the Revolution was not only a high-minded battle over principles, but also a profoundly violent civil war—one that shaped the nation, and the British Empire, in ways we have only begun to understand.
In Scars of Independence, Hoock writes the violence back into the story of the Revolution. American Patriots persecuted and tortured Loyalists. British troops massacred enemy soldiers and raped colonial women. Prisoners were starved on disease-ridden ships and in subterranean cells. African-Americans fighting for or against independence suffered disproportionately, and Washington’s army waged a genocidal campaign against the Iroquois. In vivid, authoritative prose, Hoock’s new reckoning also examines the moral dilemmas posed by this all-pervasive violence, as the British found themselves torn between unlimited war and restraint toward fellow subjects, while the Patriots documented war crimes in an ingenious effort to unify the fledgling nation.

For two centuries we have whitewashed this history of the Revolution. Scars of Independence forces a more honest appraisal, revealing the inherent tensions between moral purpose and violent tendencies in America’s past. In so doing, it offers a new origins story that is both relevant and necessary—an important reminder that forging a nation is rarely bloodless.

Hoock has definitely done his research on a topic that many people continue to have a romanticized version of our nations beginnings. Describing it more as a civil war with the Loyalists vs the Patriots. These were people torn apart by their loyalty to the Crown and those who wanted total separation from the Crown. Brothers fought brothers and Slaves and Native Americans all chose sides.

While General George Washington was waging a cruel war on the Native Americans, the rest of the country was having birth pains.

Not all the colonies were on board with this uprising and meeting to write our Continental Association. Georgia did not send delegates to the Continental Congress.

This is the unvarnished version of the birth of a nation. And it was ugly and mean and violent. As America constantly intervenes in other countries civil wars, we would do well to remember our own violent past and present and maybe take care.

A really good Historical read from Crown Publishing/Random House. Thank you to Netgalley and Crown for this copy!  Release date is May 9, 2017.

April Reads. The Good, The Bad and The Ugly!

Who Is Rich?   Coming out July 4th of this year. Just a hint, but at the end I didn’t care who Rich was.

 

Leaves of Fire (The Newirth Mythology #2) The second in the series and I am in love with this book! Release date is June 4th

 

Watching the Detectives (The Country Club Murders #5)  Meh…  May 23rd Release

Grief Cottage  Very interesting read!  Release Date is June 6th

The Simplicity of Cider   Ah….   Release Date is May 16th

The Godmothers: Spirited Away   Release Date is May 9th

 

The Woodpecker Always Pecks Twice (A Bird Lover's Mystery, #3)  Coming out on May 16th

Scars of Independence: America's Violent Birth   Release Date is May 9th

These are some of what I’ve read in April. You will have to wait for release day to read what I thought of them. Out of the 24 books I read in April I really only had 2 or 3 that were just Meh…

Now back to our regularly scheduled reading. Other Countries by Jo Bannister.

xx Patricia  vangiegolf

The Body In The Ice by A.J.Mackenzie

The Body in the Ice

Christmas Day, Kent, 1796
On the frozen fields of Romney Marsh stands New Hall; silent, lifeless, deserted. In its grounds lies an unexpected Christmas offering: a corpse, frozen into the ice of a horse pond.

It falls to the Reverend Hardcastle, justice of the peace in St Mary in the Marsh, to investigate. But with the victim’s identity unknown, no murder weapon and no known motive, it seems like an impossible task. Working along with his trusted friend, Amelia Chaytor, and new arrival Captain Edward Austen, Hardcastle soon discovers there is more to the mystery than there first appeared.

With the arrival of an American family torn apart by war and desperate to reclaim their ancestral home, a French spy returning to the scene of his crimes, ancient loyalties and new vengeance combine to make Hardcastle and Mrs Chaytor’s attempts to discover the secret of New Hall all the more dangerous.

The good widow Amelia Chaytor is trying to enjoy a Christmas meal with friends when her servant rushes in with news of a dead body half in the frozen horse pond up at New Hall, where he had been pilfering some firewood.

The ever so curious widow marches straight up to find out what is going on. On finding a body, they send for the good Reverand Hardcastle, Rector and Justice of the Peace in this small village.

Now they must figure out who the person is and what were they doing at the abandoned New Hall?

This is a hard time in history for both the violent and turbulence going on in the Americas, fresh from winning their independence from England, to the spies in England who would like to take England for the French and with America form a powerhouse allegiance. There is a shortage of able-bodied men which means the good Hardcastle and Mrs. Chaytor have very little help trying to find the truth.

When the owners of New Hall show up more questions than answers are found.

This is the second book featuring Hardcastle and Chaytor in St. Mary in the Marsh and I am a big fan of this historical mystery writing. And while quite a bit of this story may have happened. It is a fine tale!

About the Author:

A.J. MacKenzie is the pseudonym of Marilyn Livingstone and Morgen Witzel, a collaborative Anglo-Canadian husband-and-wife duo. Between them they have written more than twenty non-fiction and academic titles, with specialisms including management, medieval economic history and medieval warfare. THE BODY ON THE DOORSTEP (2016) was their first novel.

Emotional Reading on a Monday

Some of the things I’m reading.The first one Sing,Unburied,Sing by Jesmyn Ward is making my heart bleed right now. It really is difficult to read about certain times in the history of our nation and this book is one of those. I have a feeling this one is going to be big!

Have yourself a Happy Little Monday!

xx Patricia   dec123

Madame President : The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf by Helene Cooper

Madame President

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and bestselling author Helene Cooper brings us the personal story of Sirleaf as well as the larger narrative of the coming of age of Liberian women. 

Born in Monrovia in 1938, the daughter of Sirleaf’s father was Gola and her mother had mixed Kru and German ancestry. She attended college at the College of West Africa until 1955. She was married at 17 and quickly had four boys. When her husband came to the United States to study, she came also. She obtained an associate’s degree from Madison,Wisconsin. For years she studied in the United States at the best universities.

This is her personal story and I am going to tell you it was difficult to read. We don’t hear these things on the news. In a world where women take being beaten and raped as just the way it is, Ellen had a vision and she set about learning as much as she could about Economics and obtaining relationships with people who could and did help her on her journey.. When she had the knowledge she needed she then returned to her country to try and repair the damage done by past administrations. She was appointed Minister of Finance and she was tossed in prisons and threatened. But she never backed down and all of those relationships she had formed in the world of finance and politics had served her very well when she made her own bid to lead her country.

By then there was a huge movement of women in the area and they were not going to be silent much longer. In 2006 she was elected President of Liberia. She is the first woman elected head of state in African history. She has held positions with the World Bank and many other organizations and met with Obama and Hillary Clinton, when begging for help with the Ebola crisis.

Through crisis after crisis, including the Ebola outbreak, she has been a remarkable role model, fighting for her country and her people. She along with Tawakkul Karman, and Leymah Gbowee was presented with the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011.

nobelpeaceprize

As I said, this was hard to read. It is always difficult to read about human atrocities performed on the very people their government is supposed to protect. When you are dependant on that government for even your food. Nepotism was just one of the problems that kept those in power in luxury while the rest of the people suffered.  Why would no one stand up to these men? Why was the U.S. giving money to people who were only using it to pad their own pockets?

I had a lot of questions after this book. Such as why aren’t we seeing this on our World News? Who oversees all the money we send to all of these countries and how do we hold them accountable?

Thank you so much Netgalley and Simon Schuster for this early copy of an important biography.  This books set for release on March 07, 2017

The Author:

Helene Cooper is a Liberian-born American journalist who is a White House correspondent for the New York Times. Previous to that, she was the diplomatic correspondent for the paper based in Washington, D.C.. She joined the Times in 2004 as assistant editorial page editor.
At The Wall Street Journal, Cooper wrote about trade, politics, race and foreign policy at the Washington and Atlanta bureaus from 1992 to 1997. From 1997 to 1999, she reported on the European Monetary Union from the London bureau. From 1999 to 2002, she was a reporter focusing on international economics; then assistant Washington bureau chief from 2002 to 2004.